At Ryder, being a technician is about more than working on some of the highest quality vehicles in the business. It’s about mentorship and being trained and certified in the most recent technologies. It’s about working on a variety of vehicle models, brands, and types. But most importantly, it’s about having the chance to advance in your career, while experiencing the responsibility, compensation, and learning environment that only Ryder can offer.
Many experienced technicians working for automobile dealers and independent repair shops receive a commission related to the labor cost charged to the customer. Under this system, which is commonly known as “flat rate” or “flag rate,” weekly earnings depend on the amount of work completed. Some repair shops pay technicians on an hourly basis instead.
Pharmacy Times® is the #1 full-service pharmacy media resource in the industry. Founded in 1897, Pharmacy Times® reaches a network of over 1.3 million retail pharmacists. Through our print, digital and live events channels, Pharmacy Times® provides clinically based, practical and timely information for the practicing pharmacist. Features and specialized departments cover medication errors, drug interactions, patient education, pharmacy technology, disease state management, patient counseling, product news, pharmacy law and health-system pharmacy.
Take the pharmacy technician certification exam. Exams are given in virtually every state. The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) and the National Healthcareer Association (NHA) administer certification exams. Which one should you choose? Start by reviewing each exam’s prerequisites. You may be required to have work experience or formal education in order to take the test. It’s also a good idea to check with your state board or local employers to see which certification is accepted.
According to the BLS, 91% of veterinary technicians work in veterinary offices, clinics and other facilities that provide veterinary services. A smaller number of veterinary technicians work in animal shelters, zoos and research facilities. Many veterinary technicians get their start by taking paid internships with animal health care facilities, which are often available to recent graduates of accredited veterinary technology educational programs.
In honor of National Veterinary Technicians Week, Vetstreet is doing a series of articles that highlight the work of these veterinary professionals who play such a vital role in the well being of our pets. Our first piece, by Dr. Marty Becker, Time To Sing Out for Vet Techs, the Unsung Heroes of Animal Care, talks about some of the ways that vet techs take care of both human clients and animal ones. In this article, we cover more of the nuts and bolts of the important role.

There are primarily two levels of education and training for entry to this occupation—a 2-year program for veterinary technicians and a 4-year program for veterinary technologists. Most entry-level veterinary technicians have a 2-year degree, usually an associate degree, from an accredited community college program in veterinary technology, in which courses are taught in clinical and laboratory settings using live animals. A few colleges offer veterinary technology programs that are longer and that may culminate in a 4-year bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology. These 4-year colleges, in addition to some vocational schools, also offer 2-year programs in laboratory animal science. Search for schools that provide training for this career.
The role of the veterinary technician is similar to that of a registered nurse in a doctor's office. Vet techs are the veterinarian's right hand. In many cases, the vet tech will be the first person to examine an animal when it comes into the veterinary clinic. Vet techs are also employed by zoos and research labs to assist in caring for, evaluating and treating the animals. Vet techs can specialize in several different areas of medicine, including dentistry, anesthesia, nutrition and pathology. Vet techs often supervise other members of the veterinary care team such as the veterinary assistant.
In England, Scotland and Wales, since 1 July 2011, qualified Pharmacy Technicians have to be registered with the General Pharmaceutical Council (formerly the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain) to practise and call themselves a Pharmacy Technician. The title 'Pharmacy Technician' is a protected title and requires the user to register with the General Pharmaceutical Council. A Pharmacy Dispenser cannot call themselves or work as a Pharmacy Technician or register with the General Pharmaceutical Council.
Agricultural and food science technicians assist agricultural and food scientists by performing duties such as measuring and analyzing the quality of food and agricultural products. Duties range from performing agricultural labor with added recordkeeping duties to laboratory testing with significant amounts of office work, depending on the particular field the technician works in.
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