Veterinary technicians have been educated in the care and handling of animals, the basic principles of normal and abnormal life processes, and in many laboratory and clinical procedures. In general, veterinary technicians obtain 2-4 years of post-high school education and have an Associate's or Bachelor's degree in veterinary technology. They must pass a credentialing examination and keep up-to-date with continuing education to be considered licensed/registered/certified (the term used varies by state) veterinary technicians.
Other pharmacy technicians enter the occupation after completing postsecondary education programs in pharmacy technology. These programs are usually offered by vocational schools or community colleges. Most programs award a certificate after 1 year or less, although some programs last longer and lead to an associate’s degree. They cover a variety of subjects, such as arithmetic used in pharmacies, recordkeeping, ways of dispensing medications, and pharmacy law and ethics. Technicians also learn the names, uses, and doses of medications. Most programs also include clinical experience opportunities, in which students gain hands-on experience in a pharmacy.

In the National Health Service (NHS) Pharmacy Technicians work under the direct supervision of a Senior/ Specialist Pharmacy Technician and is accountable to the Chief Pharmacy Technician/ Lead Pharmacist even if not in a dispensary and work mainly in one of two areas, hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy.[18] Some also work in Doctors' general practices and in primary care trusts.

The Institute for Health Professionals does not provide clinicals or internships for the Pharmacy Technician program. However, PCC’s Career Pathways program does offer internship and clinical opportunities. The cost of Career Pathways’ clinical or internship options are in addition to the Institute for Health Professionals’ registration cost. You arrange this directly with Career Pathways.

1. Become a CVPP. When you become a certified veterinary pain practitioner (CVPP), your hospital benefits from a trained and well-educated technician in the field of pain management. While most hospitals are now practicing higher levels of pain control, there’s still much we can do to ensure our patients receive the highest level of pain management possible. (Check out the CVC for great continuing education on pain management topics.) 
Veterinary technologists and technicians earn two- or four-year degrees in veterinary technology. While they share many of the same responsibilities, technologists typically hold four-year bachelor's degrees in veterinary technology, whereas technicians hold two-year associate degrees. They must also pass an exam and become certified, licensed or registered, depending on the state. Strong science and math backgrounds are essential, Legred says, since much of the job involves drug calculations and lab tests.
Cedar Valley College offers multiple training options, including a Certificate program and an Associate program. All programs are based at their campus in Lancaster in Dallas County. The majority of of the school’s 6,759 students are on 2-year programs. The college is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges. Tuition fees for in-district students are likely to be around $1,770 and are $3,330 and $5,220 for in-state and out-of-state students respectively, while books and supplies may cost about $2,000, although this varies from program to program.
At Ryder, being a technician is about more than working on some of the highest quality vehicles in the business. It’s about mentorship and being trained and certified in the most recent technologies. It’s about working on a variety of vehicle models, brands, and types. But most importantly, it’s about having the chance to advance in your career, while experiencing the responsibility, compensation, and learning environment that only Ryder can offer.
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