Veterinary technicians typically work wherever you find veterinarians — private practices, hospitals, research labs, and zoos. While they are clearly an important part of the professional veterinary team today, this hasn't always been the case. The first "animal technician" program was created in the 1960s, before then, veterinarians hired students or office workers to feed the animals, clean the cages, answer the phone, and do other routine tasks. As the field of animal health became more complex, a need arose for a well-educated staff that could take on greater responsibilities.
There are many pharmacy technician jobs available in community pharmacies such as the ones you find in your local grocery or drug store. Working in community pharmacies means working with people. If you like an active environment where keeping customers happy and comfortable is important, pharmacy technician jobs in community pharmacies offer some great advancement opportunities.
Other pharmacy technicians enter the occupation after completing postsecondary education programs in pharmacy technology. These programs are usually offered by vocational schools or community colleges. Most programs award a certificate after 1 year or less, although some programs last longer and lead to an associate’s degree. They cover a variety of subjects, such as arithmetic used in pharmacies, recordkeeping, ways of dispensing medications, and pharmacy law and ethics. Technicians also learn the names, uses, and doses of medications. Most programs also include clinical experience opportunities, in which students gain hands-on experience in a pharmacy.
Veterinary technicians are often confused with veterinary technologists. While both occupations share some of the same job responsibilities, they work under a veterinarian to test animals and diagnose illnesses and injuries. A veterinary technician requires less education. A typical degree program completed by a veterinary technician lasts for two years and is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Licensing, certification and registration requirements for vet technicians vary by state.

Most employers require veterinary technicians to have an associate degree in veterinary technology earned through a program that has been accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Membership in professional organizations like the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA) can also enhance job opportunities by providing job listings, networking opportunities through local chapters and information about continuing education (www.navta.net).

In addition to the responsibilities above, veterinary technicians employed in a biomedical research facility perform other duties under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian, a biomedical research worker, or other scientist, such as supervising the humane care and handling of research animals and assisting in the implementation of research projects.
Houston Community College’s Certificate-level Veterinary Assistant program is based at their campus in the city of Houston, TX. Most of the school’s 58,276 students are on 2-year programs. The college is institutionally accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges. The cost of tuition for in-district students is likely to be around $1,632 and are $3,360 and $3,756 for in-state and out-of-state students respectively. Learning materials may cost around $3,000, although this will vary with the program.
The need for pharmacy techs is increasing. Retailers are expanding their pharmaceutical services, and scientific advancements continue. In addition, prescription requests are likely to increase as more people in the U.S. have access to health insurance. Pharmacy technicians will also be needed as pharmacists continue to offer more direct patient care, such as administering flu shots. Read more about your pharmacy technician career.

Pharmacy technicians work in clean, organized, well-lighted, and well-ventilated areas. Most of their workday is spent on their feet. They may be required to lift heavy boxes or to use stepladders to retrieve supplies from high shelves. Technicians work the same hours as pharmacists. This may include evenings, nights, weekends, and holidays. Because some hospital and retail pharmacies are open 24 hours a day, technicians may work varying shifts. As their seniority increases, technicians often have increased control over the hours they work. There are many opportunities for part-time work in both retail and hospital settings.

Veterinary technicians are often confused with veterinary technologists. While both occupations share some of the same job responsibilities, they work under a veterinarian to test animals and diagnose illnesses and injuries. A veterinary technician requires less education. A typical degree program completed by a veterinary technician lasts for two years and is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Licensing, certification and registration requirements for vet technicians vary by state.


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Veterinary technicians in Texas earn a median salary of $28,530 per year. The top earners in this field may command a salary of as much as $38,100 per year. Although the median vet tech salary in Texas is below the national average for this profession ($32,350 per year), this is largely offset by the low cost of living in Texas (9.7 percent below average) and also the moderate cost of housing.

In Colombia, Pharmacy Technicians are known as Pharmacy Regency Technologists, erroneously called Pharmacy Regents. They graduate of several universities after three years of training. This occupation appeared due to the lack of pharmacists in Colombia, that is why they are commonly confused with pharmacists. The Pharmacy Regency Technicians in Colombia are regulated and monitored by the Ministry of Health and Social Protection.
Tarleton State University’s Bachelor-level Veterinary Technology program is based at their campus in the town of Stephenville, Texas. Of the 11,681 students, about 13% are postgraduates. Fees for tuition for in-state students are in the order of $6,630 and for students from outside the state around $15,990 for each academic year, while study materials may cost roughly $1,200, depending on the program.
Apart from a degree in veterinary technology, veterinary technicians also need to obtain credentials from the state they work in. They also need to have strong communication skills, be well organized, and have a passion for helping animals. Most veterinary technicians work in veterinary clinics or offices, although some find work at animal shelters and zoos.
Veterinary technicians must have excellent communication skills, so that they may interact with pet owners and coworkers. They must have an understanding of animal behavior and strong clinical skills in order to properly evaluate an animal's condition and provide treatment. They must be detail-oriented and well-organized so that they may take medical histories, carry out instructions, document patient statistics and update records. It's also essential that they enjoy working with animals and have the ability to comfort, handle and restrain large and small pets.

Average Americans work well into their 60s, so workers might as well have a job that’s enjoyable and a career that's fulfilling. A job with a low stress level, good work-life balance and solid prospects to improve, get promoted and earn a higher salary would make many employees happy. Here's how Pharmacy Techs job satisfaction is rated in terms of upward mobility, stress level and flexibility.
In recent times, pharmacy technicians also speak directly with the patients on the phone to aid in the awareness of taking medications on time.[1][2][3][4] In many countries, both developed and developing, the relative importance of pharmacy technicians within the pharmacy workforce has been amplified in recent years, largely as a reaction to pharmacist shortages, resulting in an increase in their numbers and responsibilities;[5] alternative medicine, pharmacotherapeutics, customer care, retail and hospital software systems, inventory management, and infection control.[4][6]
Pharmacy technicians work under the direct supervision of a licensed pharmacist and perform many pharmacy-related functions. They refer any questions regarding prescriptions, drug information, or health matters to a pharmacist. Pharmacy techs work in a wide variety of practice settings, including community pharmacies, hospitals, the military, in-home health care settings, long term care facilities, mail service pharmacies, managed health care organizations, and educational programs.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for pharmacy technicians in 2016 was $30,920, which is $14.86 per hour. Salaries can range depending on where you work. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $21,370. The highest 10 percent, more than $45,710, with the highest earners typically working in general medical center and surgical hospitals.
Formal pharmacy-technician education programs require classroom and laboratory work in a variety of areas, including medical and pharmaceutical terminology, pharmaceutical calculations, pharmacy recordkeeping, pharmaceutical techniques, and pharmacy law and ethics. Technicians also are required to learn medication names, actions, uses, and doses. Many training programs include internships, in which students gain hands-on experience in actual pharmacies. Students receive a diploma, certificate, or an associate degree, depending on the program.
The Texas State Board of Pharmacy is the state agency responsible for the licensing/registration of Texas pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmacies; for establishing regulations for pharmacy practice; and for disciplining licensees and registrants. Look here for information about the Board's mission, Compact with Texans, policies and guidelines, members, staff, public information reports, statutes, meeting agendas, calendar of events and more.
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